domingo, 2 de abril de 2017

CAMILLE HOWARD

Resultat d'imatges de CAMILLE HOWARD


Sunday afternoon It's a Boogie Woogie Time in SENTIR EL BLUES, you know, hoy adelantamos un poco nuestro time y os proponemos unos momentos con Camille a la hora del vermuth ! ... creédme os va a saber a gloria !!  Please enjoy it.
Una de nuestras pianistas favoritas en uno de los nuestros géneros preferidos , como diría David Boogie Giorcelli....... otro fenomenal pianista de Boogie Woogie .....:   Keep on Boogie !!!!  Yeeeeeahhh !













Camille Howard (March 29, 1914 – March 10, 1993) was an American rhythm and blues pianist and singer, who first came to prominence in Roy Milton's Solid Senders in the 1940s. Her most successful recordings included "R. M. Blues" (as Milton's pianist, 1945), "Thrill Me" (as singer with Milton, 1947), and her own "X-Temporaneous Boogie" (1948).
Life and career

She was born in Galveston, Texas, the daughter of Cecilia (née Hines) and Samuel Browning. Her birth was registered as Deasy Browning, but she grew up using the name Camille Agnes Browning.[1] She learned piano and, during her teens, was a member of a local group, the Cotton Tavern Trio. By 1935 she was performing as a club musician in Galveston, as Camille Browning.

In the early 1940s, as Camille Howard, she moved from Texas to California. By 1943, she became a member of the Roy Milton Trio, who recorded for Lionel Hampton's Hamp-Tone label in 1945.[3] Milton's group then expanded to become a six- or seven-piece band, the Solid Senders, and they were signed by Art Rupe's Juke Box label, which later became Specialty Records. Howard's piano featured on singer and drummer Milton's first hit, "R. M. Blues", recorded in December 1945, on which "she plays seemingly unending, florid melodies with her right hand." The record reached number 2 on the Billboard R&B chart, and number 20 on the pop chart, in early 1946.

The record was the first of many R&B hits for Milton on the Juke Box and Specialty labels. Following its success, Howard also made her first recordings under her own name for the small Pan-American label in 1946. She stayed with Milton's Solid Senders, and was the featured piano player on all their hits through the late 1940s and early 1950s. She was the vocalist on their number 5 R&B hit in 1947, "Thrill Me".

After the success of "Thrill Me", Rupe began promoting her as a solo artist, and she had her first hit under her own name in 1948 with "X-Temporaneous Boogie", which reached number 7 on the R&B chart, and sold close to a quarter of a million copies. The track, a "roaring instrumental" in her characteristic "two-fisted thundering boogie style", was recorded with Milton and bassist Dallas Bartley, and was improvised at the end of her first recording session as leader, late on December 31, 1947; the following day, a ban on recordings imposed by the American Federation of Musicians came into effect.

She continued to play in Milton's band, and Milton was also a member of her Trio for recordings; they may have been married. Her own trio included Winston Williams (bass) and Walter Murden (drums), but she also performed occasionally with Milton, and toured with Jimmy Witherspoon, Little Willie Littlefield, Joe Liggins and others.

As well as continuing to record with Milton, Howard had 14 singles released under her own name by Specialty between 1948 and 1952, including both "storming boogies and sultry ballads".Her R&B chart hits included "You Don't Love Me" (1948), "Fiesta in Old Mexico" (1949), and "Money Blues (If You Ain't Got Money, I Ain't Got No Use For You)" (1951). She also recorded with Witherspoon, Lillie Greenwood, and others.

In early 1953, Howard signed with Federal Records, and released several more singles, but with diminishing success in the face of the growth of rock and roll. She signed with Vee-Jay Records in 1956, and that year toured with Roy Brown, Little Willie John, The 5 Royales, and Joe Tex, but she had no more hits.


She retired from the music business shortly afterwards. She maintained strong religious convictions, and in later years was unwilling to talk about her career in secular music.












Artist Biography by Bill Dahl in allmusic : 

Piano-tinkling chanteuses were quite the rage during the war years. But Camille Howard's two-fisted thundering boogie style, much like her Los Angeles contemporary, Hadda Brooks, was undoubtedly the equivalent of any 88s ace, male or female. Howard was part of the great migration from Texas to the West Coast. She was installed as pianist with drummer Roy Milton & the Solid Senders sometime during World War II, playing on all their early hits for Art Rupe's Juke Box and Specialty labels (notably the groundbreaking "R.M. Blues" in 1945).


Sensing her potential following the success of Milton's 1947 hit "Thrill Me" (with Howard's vocal), Rupe began recording her as a featured artist at the end of the year. Legend has it that Howard's biggest hit, the roaring instrumental "X-Temporaneous Boogie," was improvised at the tail-end of her first date as a leader (its flip, the torch ballad "You Don't Love Me," was a hit in its own right). Howard's vocal abilities were pretty potent too. Her "Fiesta in Old Mexico" was a hit in 1949, while "Money Blues," credited to Camille Howard & Her Boyfriends, registered strong coin in 1951. Howard cranked out storming boogies and sultry ballads for Specialty through 1953, then jumped from Federal to Vee-Jay before landing in Los Angeles for good. Howard's strong religious ties put a stop to her secular music career long ago.





Resultat d'imatges de CAMILLE HOWARD

Más info de la artista :  

http://sentirelblues.blogspot.com.es/2014/05/camille-howard.html





Camille's Boogie - Roy Milton & His Solid Senders Speciality 510b 78rpm LA 1947. Camille Howard (March 29, 1914 -- March 10, 1993) was born in Galveston, Texas. When in California in the 1940s, she became the featured piano player with Roy Milton's Solid Senders, playing on all their early hits on Juke Box and then Specialty labels. Record label head Art Rupe also began recording her as a solo artiste, with her biggest hit coming with "X-Temporaneous Boogie". She continued to record successfully in the early 1950s, but the growth of rock and roll and her own religious convictions ended her career. upload for fair use and educational use only.

Resultat d'imatges de CAMILLE HOWARD










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